Before beginning any treatment, it is important that you consult your healthcare provider and be open and honest about your plans. Having a strong doctor-patient relationship is key to establishing trust and determining an effective treatment plan that takes into account your lifestyle. “These drugs do interact with the body,” Dr. Silberstein says. “If you’re getting funny symptoms and you’re taking something that the doctor doesn’t know about, how’s he going to help you?”
CBD interacts with the body through the endogenous cannabinoid system (ECS) or endocannabinoid system. First discovered in the late 1980’s, the endocannabinoid system regulates the body’s homeostasis, or general state of balance, impacting such functions as mood, sleep, appetite, hormone regulation, and pain and immune response. Like an acrobat on a highwire, as the environment around us impacts our normal balance, the endocannabinoid system “corrects” by mediating our body’s reaction to keep us level.
Agricultural hemp is much closer to the way the plant would appear naturally in the wild whereas high-CBD cannabis is hybridized and engineered by growers to produce the highest levels of whatever compounds they deem to be most important. There is a significant argument to be made for using a whole-plant product but you will have to weigh the risks and potential side effects for yourself to decide which is best for you.
CBD oil is derived from cannabis plants that have high levels of cannabidiol (CBD) while having low levels of THC. At PureKana, our CBD oils always have less than 0.2% THC. These extracts can then be used in paste form, or mixed with other oils such as hemp seed oil, to lower the viscosity of the extract. The cannabidiol (CBD) content of CBD oil varies tremendously, since the manufacturers use a varying assortment of cannabis plants and preparation techniques. We produce CBD oil with a high concentration of CBD and containing 0.02% THC.
The 2014 Farm Bill[75] legalized the sale of "non-viable hemp material" grown within states participating in the Hemp Pilot Program.[76] This legislation defined hemp as cannabis containing less than 0.3% of THC delta-9, grown within the regulatory framework of the Hemp Pilot Program.[77] The 2018 Farm Bill allowed for interstate commerce of hemp derived products, though these products still fall under the purview of the FDA.[78][79]
I have severe neuropathy in both feet and legs. I just got the CBD oil and I am interested in learning if anyone out there has had any success with this. I know each case and pain levels are different. Just would like to see some positive remarks from people who suffer with it. I am not looking for a cure just need an update on someone who took and it helped. I already know there is no cure. I need help with the pain. Thank you.
I suffered a back injury where I herniated a disc, after surgery it had reherniated. Medication and injections only provided minor relief. Out of options I saw an add for CBD oil, I was skeptical but decided to give it a try. I needed a THC free option for work and found MedTerra. Relief occurred within an hour. Its been two months, still going strong and Ill be ordering another bottle of the 1000mg tincture as soon as I finish this review. If youre on the fence go for it, you have nothing to lose. No side effects, quick effective pain relief.
Scientifically, industrial Hemp and Marijuana are the same plant, with a genus and species name of Cannabis Sativa. They have a drastically different genetic profile though. Industrial Hemp is always a strain of Cannabis sativa, while marijuana can be Cannabis sativa, Cannabis indica, or Cannabis ruderalis. The major difference is how industrial hemp has been bred compared to a marijuana form of Cannabis sativa. Typically speaking, industrial hemp is very fibrous, with long strong stalks, and barely has any flowering buds, while a marijuana strain of Cannabis sativa will be smaller, bushier, and full of flowering buds. However, newer industrial hemp varieties in the USA are being bred to have more flowers and higher yields of cannabinoids and terpenes, such as our Kentucky hemp we’re now using!
×